Cryotherapy


Cryotherapy

The term ‘cryo-stimulation’ literally means ‘stimulation using low temperature’ (“Cryo” from the Latinised form of Greek, “kryos” for “icy cold” + “stimulation” – encouragement of something to make it develop or become more active) and is used as a modality to stimulate a beneficial physiological response from the body.

HPT uses the cooling power of carbon dioxide (CO2) – the same as the contents of the fire extinguishers seen on office and clinic walls. The CO2 is in liquid form in the cylinder and, as it leaves, expands and cools to a very chilly -78°C (-108°F), providing a stream of cooling vapor which is applied to the skin.

The technology allows a localized area of skin (the abdomen, a thigh, shoulder etc.) to be cooled quickly from around 35°C/95°F to 4°C/39°F in less than 30 seconds, using a targeted spray of cold vapor. This temperature shock causes blood vessels in the underlying tissue to constrict (vasoconstriction) as a way of protecting the body’s core temperature.